African Knowledge Base(AKB) Platform
Integrated Essential Digital Resources on Africa
Full metadata record
DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.creatorBell, Clive-
dc.creatorDevarajan, Shantayanan-
dc.creatorGersbach, Hans-
dc.date2014-01-02T22:42:07Z-
dc.date2014-01-02T22:42:07Z-
dc.date2006-04-11-
dc.date.accessioned2019-05-16T16:00:34Z-
dc.date.available2019-05-16T16:00:34Z-
dc.identifierWorld Bank Economic Review-
dc.identifierdoi:10.1093/wber/lhj006-
dc.identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10986/16464-
dc.identifier.urihttp://akb.africa-union.org/auc/handle/AKB/12389-
dc.descriptionPrimarily a disease of young adults, Acquired Immuno Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) imposes economic costs that could be devastatingly high in the long run by undermining the transmission of human capital the main driver of long-run economic growth across generations. AIDS makes it harder for victims' children to obtain an education and deprives them of the love, nurturing, and life skills that parents provide. These children will in turn find it difficult to educate their children, and so on. An overlapping generations model is used to show that an otherwise growing economy could decline to a low level subsistence equilibrium if hit with an AIDS type increase in premature adult mortality. Calibrating the model for South Africa, where the HIV prevalence rate is over 20 percent, simulations reveal that the economy could shrink to half its current size in about four generations in the absence of intervention. Programs to combat the disease and to support needy families could avert such a collapse, but they imply a fiscal burden of about 4 percent of Gross domestic product (GDP).-
dc.languageEnglish-
dc.languageen_US-
dc.publisherPublished by Oxford University Press on behalf of the World Bank-
dc.rightsCC BY-NC-ND 3.0 IGO-
dc.rightshttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/igo-
dc.rightsWorld Bank-
dc.subjectACCOUNT-
dc.subjectADVERSE EFFECT-
dc.subjectAIDS EPIDEMIC-
dc.subjectBENCHMARK-
dc.subjectBENCHMARKS-
dc.subjectCAPITAL ACCUMULATION-
dc.subjectCARE OF ORPHANS-
dc.subjectCHANGES IN FERTILITY-
dc.subjectCHILD LABOR-
dc.subjectCHILD REARING-
dc.subjectCHILDREN PER COUPLE-
dc.subjectDEPENDENCY RATIO-
dc.subjectDESCENT-
dc.subjectDEVELOPMENT ECONOMICS-
dc.subjectDIMINISHING RETURNS-
dc.subjectDISABILITY-
dc.subjectDISEASES-
dc.subjectDISPOSABLE INCOME-
dc.subjectEARLY DEATH-
dc.subjectEARNINGS-
dc.subjectECONOMETRICS-
dc.subjectECONOMIC GROWTH-
dc.subjectECONOMIC POLICY-
dc.subjectECONOMIC PRODUCTIVITY-
dc.subjectECONOMIC RESEARCH-
dc.subjectECONOMIC SYSTEM-
dc.subjectEDUCATION OF CHILDREN-
dc.subjectEDUCATIONAL ATTAINMENT-
dc.subjectEPIDEMIC-
dc.subjectEXCESS MORTALITY-
dc.subjectEXPECTED VALUE-
dc.subjectEXPENDITURE-
dc.subjectEXPENDITURES-
dc.subjectFAMILY INCOME-
dc.subjectFAMILY STRUCTURE-
dc.subjectFERTILITY-
dc.subjectFEWER CHILDREN-
dc.subjectFINANCES-
dc.subjectFISCAL POLICY-
dc.subjectFORMAL EDUCATION-
dc.subjectGDP-
dc.subjectGDP PER CAPITA-
dc.subjectGENERIC DRUGS-
dc.subjectGLOBAL AIDS EPIDEMIC-
dc.subjectGLOBAL DEVELOPMENT-
dc.subjectGROWTH RATE-
dc.subjectHEALTH POLICY-
dc.subjectHEALTH SERVICES-
dc.subjectHIV-
dc.subjectHOUSEHOLD LEVEL-
dc.subjectHUMAN CAPITAL-
dc.subjectHUSBAND-
dc.subjectIMPACT OF AIDS-
dc.subjectINEQUALITY-
dc.subjectINSURANCE-
dc.subjectINTERNATIONAL BANK-
dc.subjectINVESTMENT IN EDUCATION-
dc.subjectINVESTMENTS IN EDUCATION-
dc.subjectLABOR FORCE-
dc.subjectLABOR SUPPLY-
dc.subjectLEVEL OF EDUCATION-
dc.subjectLEVEL OF FERTILITY-
dc.subjectLEVEL OF MORTALITY-
dc.subjectLEVELS OF MORTALITY-
dc.subjectLIFE EXPECTANCY-
dc.subjectLIFE EXPECTANCY AT BIRTH-
dc.subjectLIFE SKILLS-
dc.subjectLOWER FERTILITY-
dc.subjectMACROECONOMICS-
dc.subjectMARGINAL COST-
dc.subjectMEDICAL CARE-
dc.subjectMORTALITY RISK-
dc.subjectMOTHER-
dc.subjectMOTHER-TO-CHILD-
dc.subjectMOTHER-TO-CHILD TRANSMISSION-
dc.subjectNUCLEAR FAMILIES-
dc.subjectNUCLEAR FAMILY-
dc.subjectNUMBER OF CHILDREN-
dc.subjectNUTRITION-
dc.subjectOLD AGE-
dc.subjectOPPORTUNITY COSTS-
dc.subjectOPTIMIZATION-
dc.subjectORPHAN-
dc.subjectORPHANAGES-
dc.subjectORPHANS-
dc.subjectOVERLAPPING GENERATIONS MODEL-
dc.subjectPARENTAL CARE-
dc.subjectPARENTAL DEATH-
dc.subjectPER CAPITA INCOME-
dc.subjectPHYSICAL CAPITAL-
dc.subjectPOLICY RESEARCH-
dc.subjectPOLICY RESEARCH WORKING PAPER-
dc.subjectPREMATURE ADULT MORTALITY-
dc.subjectPREMATURE DEATH-
dc.subjectPREVENTIVE MEASURES-
dc.subjectPROSTITUTES-
dc.subjectPUBLIC FUNDS-
dc.subjectPUBLIC GOOD-
dc.subjectPUBLIC POLICY-
dc.subjectPUBLIC SUPPORT-
dc.subjectRATE OF GROWTH-
dc.subjectREGRESSION ANALYSIS-
dc.subjectRESPECT-
dc.subjectSAVINGS-
dc.subjectSCHOOL ATTENDANCE-
dc.subjectSEXUAL BEHAVIOR-
dc.subjectSEXUALLY TRANSMITTED DISEASES-
dc.subjectSINGLE PARENTS-
dc.subjectSINGLE-PARENT FAMILIES-
dc.subjectSINGLE-PARENT HOUSEHOLD-
dc.subjectSINGLE-PARENT HOUSEHOLDS-
dc.subjectSOCIAL CUSTOMS-
dc.subjectSOCIAL SECTORS-
dc.subjectTAX BURDEN-
dc.subjectTAX REVENUES-
dc.subjectTOTAL REVENUE-
dc.subjectUNION-
dc.subjectUNIVERSAL EDUCATION-
dc.subjectUSE OF CONDOMS-
dc.subjectVICIOUS CYCLE-
dc.subjectVICTIMS-
dc.subjectWIFE-
dc.subjectWILL-
dc.subjectYOUNG ADULTS-
dc.subjectYOUNG CHILD-
dc.titleThe Long-Run Economic Costs of AIDS : A Model with an Application to South Africa-
dc.typeJournal Article-
dc.typePublications & Research :: Journal Article-
dc.typePublications & Research :: Journal Article-
dc.coverageAfrica-
dc.coverageSouth Africa-
Appears in Collections:World Bank (WB)

Files in This Item:
There are no files associated with this item.



Country City Visitors